Tag Archives: september

Landscaping Management 101: November

Beautiful autumn days mean comfortable working temperatures and hopefully time to continue prepping for winter. The more you do now, the easier things will be in the spring! Put things away, organize, protect, and enjoy the remaining fruits of your hard labor throughout this past year!

EARLY NOVEMBER

  • Deciduous trees, shrubs, and spring bulbs can be planted until the ground freezes.
  • Keep fallen leaves from piling up on your lawn.  This will prevent smothering this winter.
  • Outdoor planters, baskets, etc. should be emptied and washed before storing for next year.
  • Mulch in roses with 8 to 10 inches of soil or shredded bark. 
  • Water all evergreens before the ground freezes to keep them from drying out over winter.
  • Spray plants with repellents to protect them from rabbits, deer, and mice.
  • Harvest cole crops as long as possible since they are made sweeter by frost (Common cole crops include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, and kohlrabi).

MID NOVEMBER

  • Cut the lawn short (2-2.5 inches) once the leaves are off the trees to discourage snow mold and mice tunneling.
  • Protect strawberries with a 6-inch layer of clean, loose marsh hay. (We use marsh hay because it contains fewer weed seeds and stays “fluffier.”)
  • Protect tender perennials with a 2 to 3 inch layer of fresh balsam boughs.
  • Protect tree trunks from pest damage by surrounding with plastic or wire 1-2 feet higher than expected snowfall.

LATE NOVEMBER

  • Stop fertilizing houseplants since they will use less water and nutrients due to lower light levels.
  • Move pesticides and equipment to a place where they will not freeze.
  • Wash off garden tools and dry completely when storing for winter. Use a rag dipped in oil to wipe down metal parts of tools. Wipe down wooden parts with linseed oil to keep the wood from drying out.
  • Cover cole crops to prevent them from freezing solid.
  • Cut down and discard asparagus stems and leaves that have yellowed to reduce disease and insect issues next year.
  • Enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner – the fruits of your labor.

Landscaping Management 101: October

Winter is coming! Living in Wisconsin, we are accustomed to winter showing up early so, whether we like it or not, it is time to start preparing. Even light frosts can pose dangers for more tender plants like your begonias, tomatoes, and peppers. Be prepared ahead of time so you do not get caught off guard!

EARLY OCTOBER

  • Store bulbs of summer-flowering tender perennials (cannas, calla lily, begonias) if you haven’t already.
  • Spot treat broadleaf weeds. This is most effective after the first light frost or multiple nights in a row with temperatures into the 30’s.
  • Collect soil samples now for testing if desired to prepare for next year’s fertilization.
  • Protect tender vegetables if early frost is predicted by covering them just before sundown.
  • Dig up any frost-sensitive annuals and to bring them indoors for winter blooms.

MID OCTOBER

  • Finish planting tulips, daffodils, crocus, and hyacinth.
  • Begin winterization of plant material.
  • Remove and compost asparagus, peony, and rhubarb tops.
  • Individual garlic cloves can be planted and will result in full garlic bulbs next year.
  • Fertilize established trees and shrubs. Fertilization is especially recommended for more unique varieties and plants under stress.
  • Fertilize houseplants for the last time until March.

LATE OCTOBER

  • Wrap trunks of young or thin-barked trees such as green ash, honeylocust, maple, and linden with tree wrap.
  • Rake or mow leaves and make sure thick leaves are not left under the snow all winter. If leaves have fungus or disease make sure to remove them.
  • Continue mowing the lawn until it stops growing.
  • Note crabgrass areas of lawn after they are killed by hard frost and apply crabgrass preventer to prevent its return in the future.
  • Drain hoses and empty bird baths before the first hard frost.

Landscaping Management 101: September

As we enter into September, the heat of summer will finally begin to diminish as we enjoy cooler evening temperatures. The cooler temperatures create a great opportunity for some transplanting, sowing grass seed, and utilizing various herbicides as we continue to enjoy harvesting various fruits and vegetables. Let’s dive into our September Landscape Management 101.

EARLY SEPTEMBER

  • Divide spring and summer-flowering perennials.  These include peonies, daylilies, irises, oriental poppies, phlox, and many others. However, if the plant is currently blooming then it should not be divided.
  • September is a great time to plant evergreen trees!
  • Trim “Bleeder” trees such as Birch, Maple, and Elm.
  • Control broadleaf weeds in the lawn with appropriate application. Either spot treat or apply weed and feed products.
  • Seed bare spots in lawn, sow lawn seed, and/or install sod.
  • Plant spring-flowering bulbs (Tulips, Daffodils, Crocus, Hyacinth).
  • Take cuttings of shade-loving flowering annuals and herbs for growing indoors throughout the winter if desired.

MID SEPTEMBER

  • Bring house plants back indoors. Keep an eye out for insects! One way to minimize insects is to give the plant a good blast of water before bringing it inside.
  • Continue to plant spring-blooming bulbs.
  • Aerate lawn if desired to smooth out bumpy lawns, allow air and moisture to penetrate root zone, and breakdown thatch layer.
  • Harvest tender vegetables before frost.

LATE SEPTEMBER

  • Many late apple varieties can be harvested.
  • Harvest dahlias and other summer bulbs after a killing frost – when plants turn black.
  • Collect dried flowers for fall arrangements.
  • While most trees will not start losing leaves quite yet, make sure to rake up and remove any leaves affected by fungal or bacterial diseases.

As always we are here for you! Stop by with your questions or to pick up necessary fertilizers and herbicides today!