Tag Archives: landscape maintenance

Landscaping Management 101: November

Beautiful autumn days mean comfortable working temperatures and hopefully time to continue prepping for winter. The more you do now, the easier things will be in the spring! Put things away, organize, protect, and enjoy the remaining fruits of your hard labor throughout this past year!

EARLY NOVEMBER

  • Deciduous trees, shrubs, and spring bulbs can be planted until the ground freezes.
  • Keep fallen leaves from piling up on your lawn.  This will prevent smothering this winter.
  • Outdoor planters, baskets, etc. should be emptied and washed before storing for next year.
  • Mulch in roses with 8 to 10 inches of soil or shredded bark. 
  • Water all evergreens before the ground freezes to keep them from drying out over winter.
  • Spray plants with repellents to protect them from rabbits, deer, and mice.
  • Harvest cole crops as long as possible since they are made sweeter by frost (Common cole crops include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, and kohlrabi).

MID NOVEMBER

  • Cut the lawn short (2-2.5 inches) once the leaves are off the trees to discourage snow mold and mice tunneling.
  • Protect strawberries with a 6-inch layer of clean, loose marsh hay. (We use marsh hay because it contains fewer weed seeds and stays “fluffier.”)
  • Protect tender perennials with a 2 to 3 inch layer of fresh balsam boughs.
  • Protect tree trunks from pest damage by surrounding with plastic or wire 1-2 feet higher than expected snowfall.

LATE NOVEMBER

  • Stop fertilizing houseplants since they will use less water and nutrients due to lower light levels.
  • Move pesticides and equipment to a place where they will not freeze.
  • Wash off garden tools and dry completely when storing for winter. Use a rag dipped in oil to wipe down metal parts of tools. Wipe down wooden parts with linseed oil to keep the wood from drying out.
  • Cover cole crops to prevent them from freezing solid.
  • Cut down and discard asparagus stems and leaves that have yellowed to reduce disease and insect issues next year.
  • Enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner – the fruits of your labor.

Landscaping Management 101: October

Winter is coming! Living in Wisconsin, we are accustomed to winter showing up early so, whether we like it or not, it is time to start preparing. Even light frosts can pose dangers for more tender plants like your begonias, tomatoes, and peppers. Be prepared ahead of time so you do not get caught off guard!

EARLY OCTOBER

  • Store bulbs of summer-flowering tender perennials (cannas, calla lily, begonias) if you haven’t already.
  • Spot treat broadleaf weeds. This is most effective after the first light frost or multiple nights in a row with temperatures into the 30’s.
  • Collect soil samples now for testing if desired to prepare for next year’s fertilization.
  • Protect tender vegetables if early frost is predicted by covering them just before sundown.
  • Dig up any frost-sensitive annuals and to bring them indoors for winter blooms.

MID OCTOBER

  • Finish planting tulips, daffodils, crocus, and hyacinth.
  • Begin winterization of plant material.
  • Remove and compost asparagus, peony, and rhubarb tops.
  • Individual garlic cloves can be planted and will result in full garlic bulbs next year.
  • Fertilize established trees and shrubs. Fertilization is especially recommended for more unique varieties and plants under stress.
  • Fertilize houseplants for the last time until March.

LATE OCTOBER

  • Wrap trunks of young or thin-barked trees such as green ash, honeylocust, maple, and linden with tree wrap.
  • Rake or mow leaves and make sure thick leaves are not left under the snow all winter. If leaves have fungus or disease make sure to remove them.
  • Continue mowing the lawn until it stops growing.
  • Note crabgrass areas of lawn after they are killed by hard frost and apply crabgrass preventer to prevent its return in the future.
  • Drain hoses and empty bird baths before the first hard frost.

Landscaping Management 101: September

As we enter into September, the heat of summer will finally begin to diminish as we enjoy cooler evening temperatures. The cooler temperatures create a great opportunity for some transplanting, sowing grass seed, and utilizing various herbicides as we continue to enjoy harvesting various fruits and vegetables. Let’s dive into our September Landscape Management 101.

EARLY SEPTEMBER

  • Divide spring and summer-flowering perennials.  These include peonies, daylilies, irises, oriental poppies, phlox, and many others. However, if the plant is currently blooming then it should not be divided.
  • September is a great time to plant evergreen trees!
  • Trim “Bleeder” trees such as Birch, Maple, and Elm.
  • Control broadleaf weeds in the lawn with appropriate application. Either spot treat or apply weed and feed products.
  • Seed bare spots in lawn, sow lawn seed, and/or install sod.
  • Plant spring-flowering bulbs (Tulips, Daffodils, Crocus, Hyacinth).
  • Take cuttings of shade-loving flowering annuals and herbs for growing indoors throughout the winter if desired.

MID SEPTEMBER

  • Bring house plants back indoors. Keep an eye out for insects! One way to minimize insects is to give the plant a good blast of water before bringing it inside.
  • Continue to plant spring-blooming bulbs.
  • Aerate lawn if desired to smooth out bumpy lawns, allow air and moisture to penetrate root zone, and breakdown thatch layer.
  • Harvest tender vegetables before frost.

LATE SEPTEMBER

  • Many late apple varieties can be harvested.
  • Harvest dahlias and other summer bulbs after a killing frost – when plants turn black.
  • Collect dried flowers for fall arrangements.
  • While most trees will not start losing leaves quite yet, make sure to rake up and remove any leaves affected by fungal or bacterial diseases.

As always we are here for you! Stop by with your questions or to pick up necessary fertilizers and herbicides today!

Landscaping Management 101: August

One more month of heat to go before things start cooling off! Luckily, August brings a lighter workload with a focus on continuing basic upkeep and spraying your favorite plants regularly to protect them until the feeding frenzy ends. Once the night temperatures begin to drop later in September many pests will return to the ground and your battle against pests will diminish.

EARLY AUGUST

  • Keep garden weeds from going to seed.
  • Continue to monitor aphids as they will show up all season long. Combat with a strong blast of water or insecticidal soap.
  • Continue controlling cucumber beetles that spread bacterial wilt with weekly dusts of insecticides.
  • Avoid pruning trees and shrubs because the new growth may not harden off in time for winter.
  • Enjoy harvesting your fruit and vegetables regularly to avoid attracting more pests with overripe fruit.

MID AUGUST

  • Disbud dahlias for extra-large flowers.
  • Prune out old raspberry canes to prepare for next year and avoid disease. Leave 3-4 canes per foot of row.
  • Divide Iris and check for rhizome rots. Destroy all infected plants.
  • Continue watering flower beds once a week in dry periods.
  • Harvest early apples.
  • Dig early potatoes as vines die down.

LATE AUGUST

  • Continue to maintain spray program on fruit trees.
  • Harvest pears as they become light green.
  • Divide spring flowering perennials.
  • Now is a great time to seed or sod new lawns or repair damaged areas in existing lawns.
  • Continue deadheading to prepare for a final late-season flower display.

Have questions? Not sure which insecticide to use? Call or stop by Vande Hey Company today and we can give suggestions, recommend products, and walk with you as you continue striving towards your backyard dream oasis. Call 920.788.6344 today!

Landscaping Management 101: July

Things are heating up and summer is moving full force ahead. Along with the heat, keeping things hydrated and battling disease will be our biggest challenge. Don’t forget to keep yourself hydrated as well as you move forward with your July Landscape Management 101!

EARLY JULY

  • Stop harvesting asparagus and rhubarb.
  • Don’t neglect vegetable garden; continue weed control and watch leaves for signs of disease.
  • Water flower border once a week during dry periods.
  • Spray or dust tomatoes for blight control.
  • Spray or dust squashes, melons, and cucumbers to prevent bacterial wilt.
  • Deadhead annuals and perennials after flowering to encourage the plant to spend its energy producing more flowers or foliage and roots.
  • Fertilize flowering annuals to give an extra boost of energy.

MID JULY

  • Prune Yews, Junipers, and Arborvitae by mid-July.
  • Watch for rust on hollyhocks.
  • Renovate old strawberry plantings when bearing is finished.
  • Pick off dead flowers for attractive borders and blooms.
  • Keep an eye out for webs from webworm on woody plants. Cut out branches wrapped in webbing and spray with insecticide.
  • Keep plants, especially vegetables, evenly moist to promote good health as it gets warmer.
  • Harvest raspberries regularly to help discourage insects.

LATE JULY

  • Stop feeding roses and most perennials.
  • Tie Dahlias to stakes.
  • Keep lawn mown at 2 1/2” height.
  • Make last granular fertilizer applications on woody plants.
  • Alpine Currant shrubs infected with fungus will lose leaves and may defoliate completely. Fallen leaves should be removed and destroyed to reduce infection next year.
  • Watch for powdery mildew and leaf spot diseases on flowers and ornamentals.
  • Honeysuckles susceptible to aphids should be sprayed every 10-14 days with insecticidal soap.

As always, let us know if you have questions! We can give suggestions, recommend product, and help you create the beautiful backyard you’re striving toward. Call 920.788.6344 today!

Rose Month Rundown- The Complete Guide To Roses

A whole month dedicated to a plant? You better believe it! Roses hold a special place in the hearts and minds of people everywhere. Their striking beauty and lovely fragrance not only elevate your garden but also have come to symbolize love, war, history, shows like The Bachelor, and even movies such as Beauty and the Beast. While some view roses as difficult, we are here to tell you that roses, just like relationships, just need just a little extra love and effort. Here are our tips for bringing the elegance of roses and all they stand for into your backyard.

FROM THE BEGINNING

Planning ahead will not only impact the success of your roses but also help you highlight their beauty. When choosing where your roses will be placed, you want to look for a location with at least 6 hours of sun and good drainage. Planting next to a South or West facing fence or wall will help minimize the damage of our harsh Wisconsin winters. You also want to plan how your roses will be used whether it is as focal points, border shrubs, climbing vines, etc. Determining the use will help you choose the variety in addition to looking for disease-resistant and locally-hardy varieties.

When planting roses, mixing in leaf compost and adding root stimulator will help the plant get established and also create more even soil conditions which will lead to greater health and longevity.

GENERAL CARE

Roses do their best when the soil moisture is uniform so regular watering on hot and humid days can make a big difference. When watering it is best to water in the morning at ground level or use soaker hoses. Wet leaves, especially at night, are much more prone to diseases such as powdery mildew and black spot.

Hard pruning is best done in early spring (March/April). In addition to removing dead and damaged canes, we recommend cutting back 1/3 to 1/2 of the previous year’s growth until you find a healthy white center inside the cane. We also recommend light pruning throughout the season to keep your roses looking pristine!

Deadheading roses will encourage reblooming if your varieties do not develop rose hips. Leaving as much foliage on the canes as you can, cut back just below the first leaflet to encourage the foliage to continue drawing up nutrients all the way to the top.

There are multiple options for fertilizing roses, so we encourage you to stop by and ask us about your options. Whether it is a slow-release granular product or a liquid fertilizer, your roses are working hard to look beautiful and need the extra boost! You can fertilize throughout the growing season, but we recommend you stop feeding late in the summer to allow growth to slow and enter the dormant stage before winter.

BATTLING DISEASE AND INSECTS

Powdery Mildew will cause leaves to curl and twist leaving white powdery spots on the leaves. This is best prevented by proper watering as described in the general care as well as pruning to allow for air circulation.

Black Spot will leave circular black or brown spots on the tops of the leaves, starting at the bottom and working their way up. Eventually it will cause defoliation but is best prevented the same way as powdery mildew. Some basic rose care products can also take care of black spot and powdery mildew.

Insects including aphids, Japanese beetles, spider mites, and sawflies are best controlled with basic rose care products such as neem oil or insecticidal soaps. Aphids can also sometimes be handled by blasting with water in the morning.

DISPLAYING

Roses can be the highlight of your garden, but also the highlight on your or your loved one’s counter. Roses cut for display are best cut right when the petals are opening using a sharp blade to ensure a clean cut and undamaged water channels. The best time is when they are well hydrated in the early morning or evening hours. To eliminate air bubbles and encourage water uptake, you should recut the stems at a 45-degree-angle just before putting them into the vase. Strip the leaves below the water line, add other flowers like baby’s breath if desired, and change water frequently to create a gorgeous and long-lasting display!

After all of this information you can probably see why roses need a whole month to be highlighted and celebrated! Show some extra love to your roses this month and they will continue to spread the love and beauty they manifest in your yard and in your home.

Landscaping Management 101: June

June is Rose Month, so let’s work hard, but don’t forget to stop and smell the roses! We are saying goodbye to the spring and hello to the start of summer! We will also be saying hello to gorgeous annual and perennial flowers and unfortunately the pests that come along with the warmer weather. Let’s get right to it with your June Landscape Management 101!

EARLY JUNE

  • Prune all spring flowering shrubs as they finish blooming.
  • Cut peony blooms when they are one-third open if you want to bring them in for cut flowers.
  • Plant late potatoes and cabbage.
  • Fertilize bulbs and most perennial flowers now. The bulbs will be forming for next year and the perennials will be actively producing flowers!
  • Prune and transplant houseplants experiencing vigorous growth due to increased light and warmer temperatures. Fertilize monthly.
  • Control heavy plant bug damage on honey locust and ash foliage with insecticides.
  • Inspect your vegetable garden for pests, covering and spraying as necessary. If you have specific questions check with a Vande Hey Company horticulturist.
  • Spray fruit trees.
  • Cut back late spring blooming perennials such as yarrow and salvia to encourage a second flush of blooms in summer.
  • Aphids can be treated with a strong jet of water or insecticidal soap. They are typically identified by curling foliage, sticky leaves, and black sooty mold.

MID JUNE

  • Cut back delphinium after blooming.
  • Allow only 1 dahlia shoot per clump
  • Mulch woody plants to control weeds, retain moisture, and modify soil temperature extremes.
  • Stake and mulch tomatoes; thin annual flowers and vegetables.
  • Sow perennial seeds and label all perennials.
  • Remove seed clusters from lilacs.
  • Check spruce and arborvitaes for spider mites. Thoroughly wet plants with hose if present.
  • If you have not mulched yet, 2-4” of fresh mulch will discourage weeds, hold moisture, and maintain even soil temperatures. Mulch rings around trees can also prevent mower damage.

LATE JUNE

  • Pinch out tips of black raspberry shoots when 3 feet tall.
  • Remove leaves of spring flowering bulbs after they turn yellow for best development and growth next year.
  • Set house plants on shaded patio as night temperature warms.
  • Fertilize roses after first full flush of blooms.
  • Keep an eye out for Japanese beetle adults and get ready to treat grubs.

As always, let us know if you have questions! We can give suggestions, recommend product, and help you create the beautiful backyard you’re striving toward. Call 920.788.6344 today!

Landscaping Management 101: May

The weather is finally warming up, spring is in the air, and we cannot wait to get to work in our gardens! We survived the “April in Wisconsin Gauntlet” and all 5,236 different types of weather it threw at us. Now it is May! Everything is greener, brighter, and warmer! Let’s get to work!

EARLY MAY

  • Fertilize bush fruits, grapes, and ornamental shrubs.
  • Plant broccoli, early cabbage, cauliflower, and spinach.
  • Interplant annuals among spring flowering bulbs. Be gentle!
  • Scout for bare patches in your lawn, raking up dead plants and debris. Now is a great time to sow grass seed to ensure it beats out the crabgrass.
  • Treat lawn for control of broadleaf weeds.
  • Do not roll lawn. Instead aerate which will allow much needed oxygen and nutrients to get to your grass. This is especially beneficial for lawns on heavy clay soils that are compacted, lumpy, or thinning. You may need to aerate again in the fall for very lumpy lawns.
  • Prune Evergreens as new growth begins to expand.  Pinch off up to two-thirds the length of new growth “candles.”
  • Prune Forsythia after they have bloomed.
  • It is not too late to start seeds indoors, but beets, carrots, chard, kohlrabi, late cabbage, leaf lettuce, mustard, collards, turnips, radish, spinach, onion sets, onion seeds for bunching onions, peas, and potatoes can be sown directly into the garden.
  • Purchase and plant trees and shrubs now! Ask a Vande Hey Company representative for planting instructions to ensure healthy plants!
  • Examine fruit trees for Eastern tent caterpillars, being sure to remove limbs where they are nesting. You should also start your fruit tree spraying schedule. You do not want to spray when it is blooming because it can harm bees and other pollinating insects.
  • When leaves start to emerge from the buds, begin fungicide treatment. Be proactive! Apply every 14 days throughout cool season. Make sure to apply to crabapples, ninebarks, roses, and honeysuckles. Call Vande Hey Company to pick up your fungicide today!
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MID MAY

  • Plant bush beans, snap beans, and sweet corn.
  • Plant muskmelon, squash, and cucumbers.
  • Work systemic insecticides into soil around roses.
  • Stake peonies and delphiniums.
  • Prune out winter-killed wood on trees and shrubs by cutting back to green wood after new growth begins.

LATE MAY

  • Plant geraniums and tuberous rooted begonias.
  • Set out peppers, tomatoes, and eggplants.
  • Start compost pile.

Staying on top of these tasks and being proactive will help keep your landscaping healthy and beautiful! Go get your hands dirty and enjoy the warming weather!

As always, let us know if you have questions! Also, stay tuned for our brand-new service “The Plant Doctor!” Ask all your plant and gardening questions and get answers!

Landscaping Management:101 April

April Showers bring May… Well, we sure hope for showers instead of snow this year! As things continue to warm up, we can all get more and more active in the backyard! Here’s our list of things you can do in April and don’t forget about Landscape Management 101: March if you are behind schedule!

EARLY APRIL

  • Finish pruning trees and evergreens. Avoid pruning maple, elm, birch, oak, and walnut trees at this time. Pruning these trees now will cause excess sap bleeding and increase the likelihood of contracting diseases such as oak wilt.
  • Once the ground has thawed, fertilize grapes, raspberries, and blueberries before growth resumes.
  • Rake the lawn when weather conditions permit. Raking when lawns are too wet will result in pulling out large amounts of roots and live grass parts.
  • Pull out last year’s dead annuals if you have not yet done so.
  • Dead flowers, stems, leaves, etc. can serve as protection for new plants and compost in place. There is no need to clean up too much this early in the season.
  • Prune summer flowering shrubs.
  • Plant fruit trees.
  • Graft apple trees when buds begin to swell.
  • Plant pansies in a pot and place outside. Pansies can handle some frost and cold temperatures.
  • Do not work in garden soil when it is wet.
  • Collect soil samples for testing. Test multiple areas separately.

MID APRIL

  • Uncover and prune roses if weather permits. You can vent rose cones (if you are still using them) during the day, but replace by sundown. Do not feed roses until mid-May.
  • Check out your indoor plants. More sun and higher intensity will lead to quicker growth and more need for fertilizer and water. You can also prune back hard now to stimulate new growth.
  • Seed or sod new lawns as soon as the soil can be worked. 
  • Vegetables that do well in cold temperatures such as broccoli, lettuce, and parsley can be transplanted outdoors after the average last frost date (May 21-31). In the meantime, you can slowly introduce plants to the outdoors by placing flats in shaded protected areas and gradually increasing exposure to sun and wind.
  • Sow seeds indoors for the following: tomatoes, asparagus, beets, carrots, chard, kohlrabi, leaf lettuce, mustard, onion sets, parsnips, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach, and turnips.
  • Reseed or sod lawn areas injured by the winter.

LATE APRIL

  • Dig and divide fall-blooming perennials before top growth gets too tall.
  • Consider planting flowers which can be dried for winter arrangements.  Strawflower, statice, Chinese lantern, celosia, and globe amaranth are some of the best choices for successful drying.
  • Do not mow the lawn until it has grown at least 2 inches.  The roots are being renewed in the spring and grass needs vigorous initial top-growth.
  • Check birch leaves for birch leaf miner. Staying ahead of pests and treating trees early leads to greater health and success in the long run.
  • Plant onions, carrots, beets, chard, leaf lettuce, parsnips, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach, and turnips.

If you are on top of all of these things and still chomping at the bit for more, check out our blog post Get Outside! 33 Outdoor Activities You Can Do Right Now!

Have questions? Call us. Need help? Call us. Our team of experts is here for you.

Landscaping Management:101 March

You’re sitting inside waiting for the snow to melt and the ground to thaw so you can finally get started on your garden and landscaping—it’s kind of like watching paint dry, but worse. Someone keeps adding paint (or in our case, snow). What’s the solution? Stop staring at the paint! Our horticultural experts at Vande Hey Company have a few practical things you can do right now. Let’s get up off the couch and get started!

EARLY MARCH

If you were still watching paint dry in early March and haven’t started yet, you can start these things now!

  • Early March is a good time to start making cuttings of fast-growing annuals such as lysimachia, coleus, and sweet potato vine.
  • Even though it can be tempting, be careful this time of year not to remove mulch or evergreen boughs from perennials too early. If we get cold temperatures, your plants could easily be harmed.
  • If you have been storing geraniums in cool dark places, you can pot them up, cut them back, and start watering again.
  • As always, here’s your friendly reminder to feed your house plants every 2-3 weeks. March’s longer days and shorter nights will result in more rapid growth, but if it is a cloudy month, plants will still use less water and fertilizer.

 MID MARCH

  • Start slow-growing annuals indoors if you have good light. Not sure if you have good light—there’s an app for that. Search your phone’s app store for a light meter app!
  • If you have dormant sprays to combat insect pests, be sure to use them before new growth starts. Make sure temperatures will be above freezing for 8-12 hours after spraying to avoid damaging stems and needles.
  • Divide and conquer. Dahlia clumps and cannas can be split and added to pots to get growing.
  • Clean up your garden as the weather warms. Be patient; using a blowdryer is not efficient, so wait for the snow to melt on its own then get after it!
  • Remove mulch from spring flowering bulbs such as daffodils and crocus.
  • Cultivate and fertilize asparagus beds if the ground is not frozen.
  • Get pruning! The end of the dormant season is the best time to prune almost all trees and shrubs. Pines are one of the only exceptions; let young pine needles expand to about half their full size before pruning.
  • Prune raspberries, thinning the canes so there is about six to eight per foot of row, and remove the upper 20% of the cane. This will promote new growth and more fruit for the berry season. Remember those raspberry mojitos we talked about in our 2020 Garden Trends? Mhmmm.

LATE MARCH

  • Remove winter protection from roses as soon as the danger of frost is past.
  • Sprinkle systemic insecticide granules within the dripline of birch trees to prevent birch leaf miner. We recommend doing this with a systemic drench just as the trees start to break bud.
  • Sow seeds indoors for vegetables including broccoli, cabbage cauliflower, celery, eggplant, and head lettuce. Lettuce know if you have questions…
  • Start thinking about lawn care. Check out your lawn as the snow clears to check for damage, especially from voles (mice), and think about what type of lawn care you want to do this year. April is National Lawn Care Month!

Even though these are just a few suggestions, we hope you can satisfy some of your gardening itch before spring fully opens up. These tips are definitely more exciting than watching paint dry!

Have questions? Call us. Need help? Call us. Our team of experts is here for you.